how to lower electric bill on electronics
By: Griddy

Lower Your Electric Bill One Upgrade At A Time

Choose appliances that will lower your electric bill.

Take a look around your home. Take note of your appliances. If they’re old or haven’t been serviced in a while, it’s time to update and upgrade.

If you already have a Griddy membership, we know you care about saving money on electricity—and you’re already saving just by being Griddy. But we’re committed to helping you save even more on electricity, in every way possible. So this week, we’re honing in on your appliances—what are the most important upgrades you can make to lower your electricity costs? Here are a few of our top picks, so you can choose the upgrades that will make the biggest difference in your home.

Rethink your vintage fridge.

Refrigerators suck up a lot of electricity. Especially old ones.

Consider this—a fridge that is 12 years old (or older) will use about double the electricity that a new and more efficient one will. And seeing as the average electricity expenditure for refrigerators per household in the US is $153 per year, there’s a lot of room to save. Plus, you can recycle your old fridge and get some great rebates along the way.

Lighting your home can be fun. And cheap.

The average household uses about 5% of its electricity budget on lighting. So switching out your bulbs, especially the most frequently used ones, is a quick way to chip away at your electric bill even more.

Halogen incandescent, CFL, and LED light bulbs that are ENERGY STAR qualified will earn you the greatest savings. For indoor lighting, using timers and photocells can help by turning lights off while not in use, and dimmers can also help by lowering the lighting in a room. (Low lighting looks good on everyone.) CFLs or LEDs are great for outdoor lighting that is left on for extended periods of time, and ENERGY STAR qualified outdoor fixtures come with helpful features like automatic daylight shutoff and motion sensors.

And then there’s smart lighting. Smart lighting is even better than automatic shutoff features, dimmers, and timers because it connects right to your phone. Now you can control the lights from wherever you are.

Ditch your old dishwasher.

If your dishwasher was made before 1994, it’s too old—you’re paying an extra $35 per year on your electric bill. That’s money that could be going elsewhere—like a hefty supply of dishwasher detergent. Or more fun smart lights. Whichever you prefer.

An outdated dishwasher is also wasting more than 10 gallons of water per cycle. Purchasing a new and efficient one can save about 3,870 gallons of water over its lifetime. So, to sum it up, you’ll be saving water, electricity, and even more money on your electric bill with a shiny new dishwasher.

Update your HVAC.

Nearly 50% of the money spent on electricity in the United States goes to heating and cooling. That’s a pretty staggering statistic, but also a great opportunity to make a big change on your electricity usage. And we get it. Texas summers are hot. But making smarter decisions on your heating, ventilating, and air conditioning system doesn’t have to involve foregoing the AC during the hottest parts of the day. Here are a few places to start:

  • Check your filter every month, and change it at least every three months.
  • Give your HVAC equipment a tune up every year.
  • Use a programmable thermostat—it can save  you up to $180 annually in electricity costs.
  • Seal your heating and cooling ducts. It can improve the efficiency of your HVAC system by as much as 20%.

Know when to save even more.

Even if you don’t run out to update your appliances today, there’s an easy way you can save more on your bill.

All you have to do is pay attention to the real-time price of electricity. When you see that prices are creeping up, slow your electricity usage down. And if you aren’t yet a member, you can jumpstart your savings trend by going Griddy. Then, adding efficient appliances to your home is just the cherry on top of the savings you already get just by being Griddy.

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